E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
1
EE 586 Communication andSwitching Networks
Lecture 4
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Chapter 1: introduction
our goal:
get feel andterminology
more depth, detaillater in course
approach:
use Internet asexample
overview:
history
whats the Internet?
whats a protocol?
network edge; hosts, access net,physical media
network core: packet/circuitswitching, Internet structure
performance: loss, delay,throughput
protocol layers, service models
underline_base
1-2
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Performance of Internet
A key parameter : end-to-end delay
End-to-End Delay
= Delay between generation and consumption
= MtoE (Mouth to Ear) Delay
Sender Delay + Receiver Delay + Packet Delay
Sender Delay = delay at sender machine
Receiver Delay = delay at receiver machine
Packet Delay = delay in network
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
underline_base
1-3
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Sender Delay
Based on the type of data: “Elastic” vs. “Stream”
Elastic Traffic
To-be transmitted data are all available
Delay = time limited by how fast to copy from hard-drive toEthernet card = a few nanosecond  0
Stream Traffic
Data are generated at a finite rate, typically from a mediadevices like microphone or camera = a few ms
SW/HWCompression
Shaper
Packetization
Network
Packet won’t leave untilit is filled
underline_base
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
1-4
https://d2j1x2hflioiqf.cloudfront.net/images/base2/dropcam_hero2.png
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Receiver (Playout) Delay
Elastic Data
usually packets are used as soon as arrived at receiver
No delay at receiver
Streaming Data
If data is played out assoon as they arereceived, fluctuation indelays will result infrequent interruption
Data is buffered up tominimize interruption
underline_base
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
1-5
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Playout Delay
sender generatespackets in regularinterval
first packet received attime r
first playout schedule:begins at p and resultsin one late packet
second playoutschedule: begins at p’and results in no latepacket
underline_base
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
1-6
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Four sources of packet delay
1. nodal processing:
check bit errors
determine output link
OS
2. queueing
time waiting at output linkfor transmission
depends on congestionlevel of router
A
B
packets queuing (delay) or dropped ifno free buffer space (loss)
packet beingprocessed (delay)
underline_base
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
1-7
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Delay in packet-switched networks
3. Transmission delay:
R=link bandwidth (bps)
1/R=delay between sending 2bits (s)
L=packet length (bits)
time to send a packet = L/R
4. Propagation delay:
d = length of physical link
s = propagation speed in medium(~2x108 m/sec)
propagation delay = d/s
A
B
How long does it take for the 1st bit to arrive?
(propagation delay)
How fast can the router sendout one bit (transmission delay)
underline_base
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
1-8
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Caravan analogy
car~bit; 10-car caravan ~ packet
Speed of car = 100 km/hr  (propagation speed)
toll booth takes 12 sec to service one car (transmissionbandwidth = 1/12 bits/second)
Packet Delay is always based on the time when the last bit (car)arrives at the destination
Store-and-forward: the first car cannot go through the secondtoll booth until the entire caravan arrives
toll
booth
toll
booth
ten-car
caravan
d km
d km
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
Destination
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
underline_base
1-9
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Example I
100 km
100 km
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
Speed: 100 km/hr
Toll booth: 12 sec
10 cars/caravan
T = 0 s
100 km
T = 12 s
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
100km/hr*120s = 3.33 km
100 km
T = 120s (or 2 min)
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
100 km
T = 1 hr 2 min = travel time (last bit) + booth time * size of caravan
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
T = 2 hr 4 min = number of booths * time to get from one booth to the next
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
underline_base
1-10
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Timing Diagram
11
time
time
1st toll both
2nd toll both
3rd toll both
1hr
12s
1st car
2nd car
2nd car
1st car
12sx10= 2min
12sx10= 2min
time
1hr
12sx10= 2min
underline_base
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Example II
100 km
100 km
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
Speed: 1000 km/hr
Toll booth: 60 sec
10 cars/caravan
T = 0 s
100 km
T = 1 min
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
100 km
T = 7 min
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
First car arrives
100 km
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
T = 16 min = travel time + booth time * size of caravan
T = 32 min = number of booths * time to get from one booth to the next
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
MCj03985170000[1]
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
underline_base
1-12
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Timing Diagram
13
time
time
1st toll both
2nd toll both
3rd toll both
6min
60s
1st car
2nd car
2nd car
1st car
60sx10=10min
time
6min
60sx10=10min
underline_base
60sx10=10min
Use a singlearrow torepresentthe entirepacket
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Exercise
Using the previous scenario, how long does it take totransmit a file of 10,000 packets? Is it 32min x 10,000?
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
14
underline_base
time
time
16min
1st packet
10min
2nd packet
2nd packet
1st packet
time
16min
10min x10,000 pkt=100,000 min
10,000th packet
delaytotal = # of pkts * delaytrans + # of hops * (delaytrans + delayprop)
E l e c t r i c a l    &   C o m p u t e r
Department of
Electrical & Computer Engineering
Packet delay
dproc = processing delay (Cisco Router ~ 500Gbps)
typically a few microsecs or less
dqueue = queuing delay
depends on congestion
dtrans = transmission delay
= L/R, significant for low-speed links
dprop = propagation delay
a few microsecs to hundreds of msecs
Broadband:fixed and
typicallysmall
Dominant(Why?)
(modified by Cheung for EE586; based on K&R original)
underline_base
1-15